Review of Z: A Novel Of Zelda Fitzgerald

 

 

 

 

I wish I could tell everyone who thinks we’re ruined, Look closer…and you’ll see something extraordinary, mystifying, something real and true. We have never been what we seemed.
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Review of The Genius in All of Us: New Insights into Genetics, Talent, and IQ by David Shenk

With irresistibly persuasive vigor, David Shenk debunks the long-standing notion of genetic “giftedness,” and presents dazzling new scientific research showing how greatness is in the reach of every individual.

DNA does not make us who we are. “Forget everything you think you know about genes, talent, and intelligence,” he writes. “In recent years, a mountain of scientific evidence has emerged suggesting a completely new paradigm: not talent scarcity, but latent talent abundance.” Continue reading “Review of The Genius in All of Us: New Insights into Genetics, Talent, and IQ by David Shenk”

Review of Artifice: Humanities Deception from Time Immemorial by A. I. Jacob

From the publisher: 

Lets be honest with one another, we live in a world of good and evil. Whether you’re an atheist, agnostic, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu or Jew – there are good and evil people in all sects of humanity.

Why is it we can invent vaccines that can cure various diseases, but others use those same viruses to create biological weapons to kill and destroy other human kind?

Why is it we can create things like dynamite and explosive charges to move mountains to build wonderful highways so we can travel great distances, yet use those same explosive devices to build missiles and various weapons of war to kill and destroy one another?

Why can mankind build beautiful cities, buildings, parks, musical compositions, art, poetry and wondrous inventions to help us enjoy life and aid us in our day to day chores – yet the majority of the human race lives in squalor and our cities are filled with crime, drugs and every conceivable evil under the sun? Continue reading “Review of Artifice: Humanities Deception from Time Immemorial by A. I. Jacob”

It’s Like Reading, Only Better!

Okay, well, maybe not. But I seriously can’t get these things off my mind. Can you blame me? Continue reading “It’s Like Reading, Only Better!”

Review of The Sun’s Heartbeat And Other Stories from the Life of the Star That Powers Our Planet by Bob Berman

 

From the publisher:

The beating heart of the sun is the very pulse of life on earth. And from the ancients who plotted its path at Stonehenge to the modern scientists who unraveled the nuclear fusion reaction that turns mass into energy, humankind has sought to solve its mysteries. In this lively biography of the sun, Bob Berman ranges from its stellar birth to its spectacular future death with a focus on the wondrous and enthralling, and on the heartbreaking sacrifice, laughable errors, egotistical battles, and brilliant inspirations of the people who have tried to understand its power.

What, exactly, are the ghostly streaks of light astronauts see-but can’t photograph-when they’re in space? And why is it impossible for two people to see the exact same rainbow? Why are scientists beginning to think that the sun is safer than sunscreen? And how does the fluctuation of sunspots-and its heartbeat-affect everything from satellite communications to wheat production across the globe?

Peppered with mind-blowing facts and memorable anecdotes about spectral curiosities-the recently-discovered “second sun” that lurks beneath the solar surface, the eerie majesty of a total solar eclipse-THE SUN’S HEARTBEAT offers a robust and entertaining narrative of how the Sun has shaped humanity and our understanding of the universe around us. Continue reading “Review of The Sun’s Heartbeat And Other Stories from the Life of the Star That Powers Our Planet by Bob Berman”

Review of Nom De Plume by Carmela Ciuraru

From the publisher: 

What’s in a name?

In our “look at me” era, everyone’s a brand. Privacy now seems a quaint relic, and self-effacement is a thing of the past. Yet, as Nom de Plume reminds us, this was not always the case. Exploring the fascinating stories of more than a dozen authorial impostors across several centuries and cultures, Carmela Ciuraru plumbs the creative process and the darker, often crippling aspects of fame.

Biographies have chronicled the lives of pseudonymous authors such as Mark Twain, Isak Dinesen, and George Eliot, but never before have the stories behind many noms de plume been collected into a single volume. These are narratives of secrecy, obsession, modesty, scandal, defiance, and shame: Only through the protective guise of Lewis Carroll could a shy, half-deaf Victorian mathematician at Oxford feel free to let his imagination run wild. The “three weird sisters” (as they were called by the poet Ted Hughes) from Yorkshire–the Brontes–produced instant bestsellers that transformed them into literary icons, yet they wrote under the cloak of male authorship. Bored by her aristocratic milieu, a cigar-smoking, cross-dressing baroness rejected the rules of propriety by having sexual liaisons with men and women alike, publishing novels and plays under the name George Sand.

Grounded by research yet highly accessible and engaging, these provocative, astonishing stories reveal the complex motives of writers who harbored secret identities–sometimes playfully, sometimes with terrible anguish and tragic consequences. A wide-ranging examination of pseudonyms both familiar and obscure, Nom de Plume is part detective story, part expose, part literary history, and an absorbing psychological meditation on identity and creativity. Continue reading “Review of Nom De Plume by Carmela Ciuraru”

Review of Conversations With God by Neale Donald Walsch

Book description (from amazon.com): 

Conversations with God Book 1 began a series that has been changing millions of lives for more than ten years. Finally, the bestselling series is now a movie, starring Henry Czerny (The Pink Panther and Clear and Present Danger) and Ingrid Boulting (The Last Tycoon). Produced and directed by Stephen Simon (producer of Somewhere in Time and What Dreams May Come) and distributed by Samuel Goldwyn Films and Fox Home Entertainment, the theatrical release is set for October 27, 2006. The movie is the true account of Walsch (played by Cierny), who went from an unemployed homeless man to an “accidental spiritual messenger” and author of the bestselling book.

 

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