Death Of An Assassin by Ann Marie Ackermann

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The year is 1835. In the Kingdom of Württemberg, in the small town of Bönnigheim, a murder has just been committed. The town’s beloved mayor has been gunned down in cold blood- a senseless crime with no apparent motive- and the elusive murderer manages to slip away, seemingly without trace. Despite the best efforts of a remarkably ingenious investigator, the case would remain unsolved for decades.

On the other side of the Atlantic, a storm is brewing between the Mexican government and American settlers, eventually erupting into the Texas Revolution. As America is drawn into war with Mexico, troops are amassed to besiege Veracruz in what would become the first large-scale amphibious assault conducted by United States military forces, and the largest in history until D-Day. In writing of the battle, Robert E Lee makes a curiously poignant entry in his journal regarding the heroic death of a German-American soldier, remarking “I doubt whether all Mexico is worth to us the life of that man”. Little could he have known that the man to whom he ascribed such praise was actually an assassin.
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Featured Book: Into the Skies: A World War I Aviator Story by Christopher Carroll

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This story portrays an American who gets caught up in World War One as an ‘aviator’ from the beginning to the end, an unusual achievement, which makes for an absorbing tale. The author has taken elements from the memoirs of aviation pioneers, most of which began in the last years of the war, modified them to reflect changes that occurred from 1914 to 1918, and added other adventures. The back story includes some instances from the infancy of flight and the inspiration it provided a boy as he grew up in Dayton, Ohio.
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Hitler’s Cross: How the Cross was used to promote the Nazi agenda by Erwin W. Lutzer

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ebq5stDr. Erwin Lutzer lays out the fascinating and seldom examined story of Nazi Germany’s paradoxical attempt to use the Church to overthrow Christianity in his book Hitler’s Cross: How the cross was used to promote the Nazi agenda.

“Deine Reich Komme,” Hitler prayed these words publicly- Thy Kingdom Come. But to whose kingdom was he referring? The answer to that question is the heart and soul of this book, as Lutzer examines the rabid hatred that Hitler and his National Socialist Party (NAZIS) had for Christianity, and how he sought to infiltrate the church with his own philosophy and ideals to destroy it from within.
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Featured Post: Jacqueline by Jackie Minniti

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When ten-year-old Jacqueline Falna hears her mother’s scream, she is unaware that the axis of her world is about to tilt. Her father’s plane has been shot down by German fighters. In the midst of poverty, food shortages, air raids, and the grinding hardship of daily life under Nazi rule, she forms an unlikely alliance with David Bergier, a twelve-year-old Jewish neighbor who poses as her cousin after his family is “relocated” by the Nazis. When Rennes is liberated, Jacqueline meets an American soldier and becomes convinced that he has been sent to reunite her with her father.

Based on a true story, “Jacqueline” is a tale of family, faith, unusual friendships, and the resiliency of the human spirit set against the backdrop of occupied Rennes in 1944. With the drama of fiction and the authenticity of personal history, “Jacqueline” is both a story about family and a family’s story.  Continue reading “Featured Post: Jacqueline by Jackie Minniti”

Shot Down: The true story of pilot Howard Snyder and the crew of the B-17 Susan Ruth by Steve Snyder

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Author Steve Snyder pens the exciting true account of the WWII B-17 Susan Ruth and it’s crew, piloted by his own father Howard Snyder.

Utilizing information taken from personal letters, interviews, declassified military records and verbal and written accounts, Steve Snyder has crafted together a fascinating and incredibly vivid account of the life and events of the crew of the Susan Ruth throughout the bombing campaigns in Europe during WWII.

Exhaustively researched and full of vibrant detail, Snyder gives the reader a very real feel for what it was like living in the tumultuous period of history- especially for the pilots and crew members.
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Across Great Divides by Monique Roy

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Across Great Divides chronicles the story of Eva and Inge, two identical twin sisters growing up in Nazi Germany. As Jews, life becomes increasingly difficult for them and their family under the oppressive and anti-Semitic laws of the Nazis. Then, after witnessing the horrors of Kristallnacht, they realize they must leave their beloved homeland if they hope to survive.

Unsure of where to go, they travel to Antwerp, Belgium, and then on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, chasing the diamond trade in hopes of finding work for their father, a diamond cutter and jeweler by trade. Finally, they find a home for themselves in the beautiful country of South Africa and begin to settle down.

But just as things begin to feel safe, their new home becomes caught up in it’s own battles of bigotry and hate under the National Party’s demand for an apartheid South Africa. Eva and Inge wonder if they will ever be allowed to live in peace, though they cling to the hope for a better day when there will be “an understanding of the past, compassion for all humanity, and …hope and courage to move forward across great divides.” Continue reading “Across Great Divides by Monique Roy”