Words Matter: A Review of Redemption by William E. Jefferson

REDEMPTION is a companion book to The Point: The Redemption of Oban Ironbout. The work is set on the metaphorical Isle of Estillyen, where creative monks stage dramatic readings of biblical stories. In The Point, the readings were presented in synopsis form. Now readers can delve into the twelve Scripture narratives as they were originally given by the monks of Estillyen. Richly inspiring, this unique volume promises to draw readers closer to the theme of redemption–and to the Redeemer himself. The story beckons. Life it gives. Redemption it offers.

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Review of The Genius in All of Us: New Insights into Genetics, Talent, and IQ by David Shenk

With irresistibly persuasive vigor, David Shenk debunks the long-standing notion of genetic “giftedness,” and presents dazzling new scientific research showing how greatness is in the reach of every individual.

DNA does not make us who we are. “Forget everything you think you know about genes, talent, and intelligence,” he writes. “In recent years, a mountain of scientific evidence has emerged suggesting a completely new paradigm: not talent scarcity, but latent talent abundance.” Continue reading “Review of The Genius in All of Us: New Insights into Genetics, Talent, and IQ by David Shenk”

Review of Artifice: Humanities Deception from Time Immemorial by A. I. Jacob

From the publisher: 

Lets be honest with one another, we live in a world of good and evil. Whether you’re an atheist, agnostic, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu or Jew – there are good and evil people in all sects of humanity.

Why is it we can invent vaccines that can cure various diseases, but others use those same viruses to create biological weapons to kill and destroy other human kind?

Why is it we can create things like dynamite and explosive charges to move mountains to build wonderful highways so we can travel great distances, yet use those same explosive devices to build missiles and various weapons of war to kill and destroy one another?

Why can mankind build beautiful cities, buildings, parks, musical compositions, art, poetry and wondrous inventions to help us enjoy life and aid us in our day to day chores – yet the majority of the human race lives in squalor and our cities are filled with crime, drugs and every conceivable evil under the sun? Continue reading “Review of Artifice: Humanities Deception from Time Immemorial by A. I. Jacob”

Review of North of Hope by Shannon Huffman Polson

From the publisher: After her parents are killed in a rare grizzly attack, the author is forced into a wilderness of grief. Turning to loves she learned from her father, Polson explores the perilous terrain of grief through music, the natural world, and her faith. Her travels take her from the suburbs of Seattle to the concert hall where she sings Mozart’s Requiem, and ultimately into the wilderness of Alaska’s remote Arctic and of her heart. 

This deeply moving narrative is shot through with the human search for meaning in the face of tragedy. Polson’s deep appreciation for the untamed and remote wilderness of the Alaskan Arctic moves her story effortlessly between adventure, natural history, and sacred pilgrimage, as much an internal journey as a literal one. Readers who appreciate music or adventure narratives and the natural world or who are looking for new ways to understand loss will find guidance, solace, and a companionable voice in this extraordinary debut.

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